Posts tagged "novel"

"Who knows how to make love stay?"

  1. Tell love you are going to Junior’s Deli on Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn to pick up a cheesecake, and if loves stays, it can have half. It will stay.

  2. Tell love you want a momento of it and obtain a lock of its hair. Burn the hair in a dime-store incense burner with yin/yang symbols on three sides. Face southwest. Talk fast over the burning hair in a convincingly exotic language. Remove the ashes of the burnt hair and use them to paint a moustache on your face. Find love. Tell it you are someone new. It will stay.

  3. Wake love up in the middle of the night. Tell it the world is on fire. Dash to the bedroom window and pee out of it. Casually return to bed and assure love that everything is going to be all right. Fall asleep. Love will be there in the morning.

― Tom Robbins,

Read More

liy:

I have to admit the book cover was a little ‘chick-lit’ looking for me to have ever taken seriously perched on the shelf, but Jonathan Franzen had the front blurb and Helen Fielding had one at the back, and I’m douchey that way for pausing to pick it up. I sat with it for half an hour in the bookstore while boyfriend patiently waited with a photo book of rare Bob Dylan photos and then decided to buy it after all. Semple, as it turns out, crafts great characters. It’s especially impressive how I can practically feel her building my ideas of Bernadette as I turn each page, but still have no clue where the book’s going to take me next. Now it’s 3:20 am and I can’t sleep.

edit: Googled Semple. This is her second novel and she’s a writer for TV. Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen!

adifferentuniverse:

Current Read: “My Name is Red” by Orhan Pamuk. Deeply imaginative and very enjoyable! 
“‎For if a lover’s face survives emblazoned on your heart, the world is still your home.”—Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red.

adifferentuniverse:

Current Read: “My Name is Red” by Orhan Pamuk. Deeply imaginative and very enjoyable! 

‎For if a lover’s face survives emblazoned on your heart, the world is still your home.—Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red.

jaclynday:

What I’ve Read: The Atlas of Love by Laurie Frankel
I picked this up from a Borders clearance sale that Brandon and I popped into recently (all books 90% off…it was sad and exhilarating at the same time). I thought the cover looked cute and I’m never one to turn down a book that costs about $1. (Again, so sad!)
Because I paid such a low price for the book and because it was one of the “leftovers” in the fiction section, I didn’t have high expectations. I just wanted to be entertained and thought it looked like a good, light read…perfect for reading in the bath or with a cup of tea.
Instead, I was happily surprised that Frankel’s dialogue and character development grabbed me from the first page and held my attention until I finished. It’s her first published book, but you wouldn’t know it. She has a confident voice and the interesting details in this book kept it from being your cliched “baby on the cover” novel. The book’s pace does ebb and flow, but I was charmed enough by her writing to keep powering through.
The Atlas of Love is the story of three English-lit graduate students: Janey, Katie and Jill, who band together to help Jill when she becomes unexpectedly pregnant. After Jill’s boyfriend makes a break for it, Janey and Katie become substitute parents—living with Jill and Atlas (her son) and helping with everything from feedings to naps to play time. The book is thought-provoking, especially as tensions grow between the girls as Jill starts to pull away from the intimacy of their unconventional “family” situation.
The book is thoroughly charming and I hope Frankel continues on to write a sequel, since several of the character’s story lines have plenty left to explore. If you need a heart-warming “chick lit” book but would rather do without the cliches that usually come along with the genre, this is a good place to start.
P.S. Have you entered my book giveaway yet? 
Have you read this book? What did you think?

jaclynday:

What I’ve Read: The Atlas of Love by Laurie Frankel

I picked this up from a Borders clearance sale that Brandon and I popped into recently (all books 90% off…it was sad and exhilarating at the same time). I thought the cover looked cute and I’m never one to turn down a book that costs about $1. (Again, so sad!)

Because I paid such a low price for the book and because it was one of the “leftovers” in the fiction section, I didn’t have high expectations. I just wanted to be entertained and thought it looked like a good, light read…perfect for reading in the bath or with a cup of tea.

Instead, I was happily surprised that Frankel’s dialogue and character development grabbed me from the first page and held my attention until I finished. It’s her first published book, but you wouldn’t know it. She has a confident voice and the interesting details in this book kept it from being your cliched “baby on the cover” novel. The book’s pace does ebb and flow, but I was charmed enough by her writing to keep powering through.

The Atlas of Love is the story of three English-lit graduate students: Janey, Katie and Jill, who band together to help Jill when she becomes unexpectedly pregnant. After Jill’s boyfriend makes a break for it, Janey and Katie become substitute parents—living with Jill and Atlas (her son) and helping with everything from feedings to naps to play time. The book is thought-provoking, especially as tensions grow between the girls as Jill starts to pull away from the intimacy of their unconventional “family” situation.

The book is thoroughly charming and I hope Frankel continues on to write a sequel, since several of the character’s story lines have plenty left to explore. If you need a heart-warming “chick lit” book but would rather do without the cliches that usually come along with the genre, this is a good place to start.

P.S. Have you entered my book giveaway yet?

Have you read this book? What did you think?

matthewhubbard:

 
I’m currently reading:
 
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
by Ransom Riggs 
A mysterious island.
An abandoned orphanage.
A strange collection of very curious photographs.
It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

matthewhubbard:

 

I’m currently reading:

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

by Ransom Riggs

A mysterious island.

An abandoned orphanage.

A strange collection of very curious photographs.

It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.
Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey (via blithelybliss)
Australian Center for Photography / Kate Bernauer: “The Novel”"In this series of images, Kate Bernauer explores the bittersweet nature of human experience. Using theatrical lighting and simple props, she creates scenarios in which ordinary people attempt impossible tasks, blind to their own folly and to the potentially disastrous results of their actions. Darkly humorous, Bernauer’s images serve as poetic metaphors for hope, determination and ultimately, failure." See the official site of Kate Bernauer. Australian Center for Photography / Kate Bernauer: “The Novel”

"In this series of images, Kate Bernauer explores the bittersweet nature of human experience. Using theatrical lighting and simple props, she creates scenarios in which ordinary people attempt impossible tasks, blind to their own folly and to the potentially disastrous results of their actions. Darkly humorous, Bernauer’s images serve as poetic metaphors for hope, determination and ultimately, failure." See the official site of Kate Bernauer.

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