Posts tagged "literature"
For entire days nobody spoke to him at all, his throat jammed with words unuttered, his heart and mind turned into blunt aching things…
Kiran Desai, The Inheritance of Loss (via nonsunblob)
You have to protect yourself from sadness. Sadness is very close to hate. Let me tell you this. This is the thing I learned. If you take in someone else’s poison - thinking you can cure them by sharing it - you will instead store it within you
Michael Ondaatje “The English Patient” (via welcometomytruth-gemseej)
little-spooky-cupcake:

English major? Makes sense. #books #bookshelf #literature #english #englishmajor #school #college (Taken with Instagram)

little-spooky-cupcake:

English major? Makes sense. #books #bookshelf #literature #english #englishmajor #school #college (Taken with Instagram)

melissamontoya:

#Reading The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. #journalism #nytimes #huffpo #lit #literature (Taken with Instagram)

melissamontoya:

#Reading The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. #journalism #nytimes #huffpo #lit #literature (Taken with Instagram)

alexaitkenmusic:

Just started reading this, it’s pretty fucking weird so far. Not complaining.

alexaitkenmusic:

Just started reading this, it’s pretty fucking weird so far. Not complaining.

onwindshoes:

character map.

onwindshoes:

character map.

liy:

I have to admit the book cover was a little ‘chick-lit’ looking for me to have ever taken seriously perched on the shelf, but Jonathan Franzen had the front blurb and Helen Fielding had one at the back, and I’m douchey that way for pausing to pick it up. I sat with it for half an hour in the bookstore while boyfriend patiently waited with a photo book of rare Bob Dylan photos and then decided to buy it after all. Semple, as it turns out, crafts great characters. It’s especially impressive how I can practically feel her building my ideas of Bernadette as I turn each page, but still have no clue where the book’s going to take me next. Now it’s 3:20 am and I can’t sleep.

edit: Googled Semple. This is her second novel and she’s a writer for TV. Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen!

Short Stories You Should Read

elliottholt:

Listed in no particular order. I forced myself to choose only one story per writer (very difficult in some cases). There is a lot of amazing short fiction out there, but these are stories—of various styles—that have stuck with me over the years and have taught me what a story can be. I’m sure I’m forgetting a lot of gems.

  1. “Wakefield” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  2. “Berenice” by Edgar Allan Poe
  3. “The Lady with the Lap Dog” by Chekhov
  4. “The Overcoat” by Gogol
  5. “The Necklace” by Guy Maupassant
  6. “A Hunger Artist” by Franz Kafka
  7. “The Dead” by James Joyce
  8. “The Secret Life of Walter Middy” by James Thurber
  9. “Barn Burning” by William Faulkner
  10. “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson
  11. “The Snows of Kilamanjaro” by Ernest Hemingway
  12. “Friend of My Youth” by Alice Munro
  13. “When We Were Nearly Young” by Mavis Gallant
  14. “Work” by Denis Johnson
  15. “Wants” by Grace Paley
  16. “The Swimmer” by John Cheever
  17. “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor
  18. “Hitch-Hikers” by Eudora Welty
  19. “The Laughing Man” by J.D. Salinger
  20. “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver
  21. “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried” by Amy Hempel
  22. “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin
  23. “In the Heart of the Heart of the Country” by William Gass
  24. “After Rain” by William Trevor
  25. “White Angel” by Michael Cunningham
  26. “Girl” by Jamaica Kinkaid
  27. “A Rich Man” by Edward P. Jones
  28. “Do Not Disturb” by A.M. Homes
  29. “Twenty Minutes” by James Salter
  30. “Happy Memories” by Lydia Davis
  31. “Screenwriter” by Charles D’Ambrosio
  32. “Memory Wall” by Anthony Doerr
  33. “L. Debard and Aliette” by Lauren Groff
  34. “Bullet in the Brain” by Tobias Wolff
  35. “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien
  36. “Boys Town” by Jim Shepard
  37. “The Fat Girl” by Andre Dubus
  38. “Pastoralia” by George Saunders
  39. “Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned” by Wells Tower
  40. “Men Under Water” by Ralph Lombreglia
  41. “All the Way in Flagstaff, Arizona” by Richard Bausch
  42. “Brownies” by Z.Z. Packer
  43. “Hell-Heaven” by Jhumpa Lahiri
  44. “Sindbad” by Donald Barthelme
  45. “I Used to Live Here Once” by Jean Rhys
  46. “The Girl Detective” by Kelly Link
  47. “Sororally” by Gary Lutz
  48. “Train” by Joy Williams
  49. “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” by Karen Russell
  50. “The Magic Poker” by Robert Coover
  51. “Lady” by Diane Williams
  52. “Love and Honour and Pity and Pride and Compassion and Sacrifice” by Nam Le
  53. “Natasha” by David Bezmozgis
  54. “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” by Joyce Carol Oates
  55. “A Spoiled Man” by Daniyal Mueenuddin
  56. “Rock Springs” by Richard Ford
  57. “The Custodian” by Deborah Eisenberg
  58. “In the Gloaming” by Alice Elliott Dark
  59. “You’re Ugly, Too” by Lorrie Moore
  60. “A Romantic Weekend” by Mary Gaitskill
  61. “Blessed Assurance” by Allan Gurganus
  62. “The Half-Skinned Steer” by Annie Proulx
  63. “Drown” by Junot Diaz
  64. “Immortality” by Yiyun Li
  65. “Sun City” by Caitlin Horrocks
  66. “None of the Above” by Suzanne Rivecca
  67. “Virgins” by Danielle Evans
  68. “Safari” by Jennifer Egan
  69. “Testimony of Pilot” by Barry Hannah
  70. “These Hands” by Kevin Brockmeier
liy:

I don’t need to be protected from a book. Do you?
I’ve started a pet project of sorts (tentatively) called DON’T LIMIT MY LIT. In a nutshell, it’s about book banning. I’m going to keep it going for at least six months— which I like because Banned Books Week will be going on right in the middle. Book banning trends and lawsuits have been flying around in my country lately, so I’ve suddenly taken an interest in learning as much as I can about the big picture of book burning banning on an international scale, away from the overall theme of fuckyeahreading, my tumblr book baby (which by the way I seriously still can’t believe has found itself 7,497 followers).
If you’re interested in book banning or what I’ll find, such as
news
trivia
history
quotes from banned books
or quotes about censorship and ban culture—
good or bad, from Malaysia and all around the world, then COME keep me company and follow the Tumblr. If you’re not around these here parts very often, then why not Like its Facebook page?
Reblogs, likes, submissions, even applications for co-admins are all welcome to the party.

liy:

I don’t need to be protected from a book. Do you?

I’ve started a pet project of sorts (tentatively) called DON’T LIMIT MY LIT. In a nutshell, it’s about book banning. I’m going to keep it going for at least six months— which I like because Banned Books Week will be going on right in the middle. Book banning trends and lawsuits have been flying around in my country lately, so I’ve suddenly taken an interest in learning as much as I can about the big picture of book burning banning on an international scale, away from the overall theme of fuckyeahreading, my tumblr book baby (which by the way I seriously still can’t believe has found itself 7,497 followers).

If you’re interested in book banning or what I’ll find, such as

  • news
  • trivia
  • history
  • quotes from banned books
  • or quotes about censorship and ban culture—

good or bad, from Malaysia and all around the world, then COME keep me company and follow the Tumblr. If you’re not around these here parts very often, then why not Like its Facebook page?

Reblogs, likes, submissions, even applications for co-admins are all welcome to the party.

Books help to form us. If you cut me open, you will find volume after volume, page after page, the contents of every one I have ever read, somehow transmuted and transformed into me. Alice in Wonderland. the Magic Faraway Tree. The Hound of the Baskervilles. The Book of Job. Bleak House. Wuthering Heights. The Complete Poems of W.H. Auden. The Tale of Mr Toad. Howard’s End. What a strange person I must be. But if the books I have read have helped to form me, then probably nobody else who ever lived has read exactly the same books, all the same books and only the same books as me. So just as my genes and the soul within me make me uniquely me, so I am the unique sum of the books I have read. I am my literary DNA.
Susan Hill, Howards End Is on the Landing: A Year of Reading from Home (via cystallineambermoments)

(via cystallineambermoments-deactiva)

Among other things, you’ll find that you’re not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You’re by no means alone on that score, you’ll be excited and stimulated to know. Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles, You’ll learn from them - if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It’s a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn’t education. It’s history. It’s poetry.

Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger

  • The most censored book in US high schools & libraries from 1961 to 1982. 
  • In 1982 it was BOTH the most censored book AND the 2nd most taught book in US public schools. 
  • The 10th most frequently challenged book from 1990 to 1999. 

The American Library Association provides a full history of Catcher In The Rye’s controversy.

(via dontlimitmylit)

constantly stalking & celebrating tumblr's reading habits. all opinions belong to those we reblog, unless signed off by us. Here's to finding new book buys, new favorite writers, & new reading buddies!



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